MIT Scientists Build Nanowire Structures for Use in Tiny Lithium-Ion Batteries

By , April 6, 2008 11:33 am

MIT Scientists Build Nanowire Structures for Use in Tiny Lithium-Ion Batteries
MIT scientists have harnessed the construction talents of tiny viruses to build ultra-small “nanowire” structures for use in very thin lithium-ion batteries.

By manipulating a few genes inside these viruses, the team was able to coax the organisms to grow and self-assemble into a functional electronic device.

The goal of the work, led by MIT Professors Angela Belcher, Paula Hammond and Yet-Ming Chiang, is to create batteries that cram as much electrical energy into as small or lightweight a package as possible. The batteries they hope to build could range from the size of a grain of rice up to the size of existing hearing aid batteries.

Now THAT’S some serious nanotech! Cool stuff!

2 Responses to “MIT Scientists Build Nanowire Structures for Use in Tiny Lithium-Ion Batteries”

  1. Steve says:

    I didn’t see it in the article (maybe I missed it), but what happens to the viruses when the current starts to flow? “Hey dude, look, we’re all finished with the cobalt oxide deposit now!” “ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZT!!!!”

    I know I’m anthropomorphizing here, but that seems like a rotten payback for all the work. Then again, maybe it just gives them a buzz…..

  2. Dave says:

    Have no idea but then again they didn’t go into the lifespan of the viruses either. I would suspect that they would die prior to the device being put into operation but then again they could be an active part of it’s operation.

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